An Update on Sodium storage

The latest contribution from Olde Engberink in Amsterdam on the emerging story of sodium storage is Open Access; https://doi.org/10.1007/s00467-019-04305-8 Olde Engberink RHG, Selvarajah V, Vogt L. Clinical impact of tissue sodium storage. Pediatr Nephrol. 2019. And a new diagram for our basic electrolyte physiology teaching for clinicians. The authors conclude

Microvascular ion transport through endothelial glycocalyx layer: new mechanism and improved Starling principle

Xi Zhuo Jiang, Yiannis Ventikos,* and Kai H. Luo*  Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, London, United Kingdom  Submitted 11 December 2018; accepted in final form 19 April 2019  Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 317: H104–H113, 2019. First published April 26, 2019; doi:10.1152/ajpheart.00794.2018.  Well, I’ve bought a download

Well this is embarrassing…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qm86qUPS0eI The worst conference presentation I ever made has recently been posted on YouTube by someone called nsicu ru; I probably consented to recording, but did not know it had been so publicly posted. I was the second speaker in a two-presentation morning session, and the first speaker who disapproves

Now on YouTube

FluidPhysiology announces it’s premiere on YouTube, launched yesterday to our twitter followers. The link is; youtu.be/8-w_MO38Umo If you search The Starling Principle or Starling equation or capillary fluid exchange you’ll find many enthusiastic video bloggers, from medical students to professors, explaining the traditional filtration/ reabsorption concept. Some of them have

Albumin infusion increases the volume of distribution of albumin: a randomized clinical trial in postoperative patients after major surgery

Fresh off the press from Lund, Sweden, this interesting investigation. https://ccforum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13054-019-2477-7 Sixty four post-surgical patients with normal heart rate and blood pressure were given human albumin solution 5% in a volume equivalent to 25% of their normal plasma volume in case they were hypovolaemic. How did that get past the

A new Twigley – Hillman diagram

While trying to direct people away from the classic Twigley – Hillman diagram and towards my kinetic diagrams it became apparent that the standard plasma/ interstitial/ intracellular compartment boxes divided by capillary wall or cell membrane is now so ingrained that I have to take a different approach. With thanks